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We would like to thank all of our partners and friends for their continued support. Your contribution serves as a great reminder for us, above everything else, to keep hope alive! Any donation you make will enable us to continue to serve the Palestinian people, especially women, young women and youth and will support our mission towards Just Peace and a brighter future for all. 



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Fatima from Dayr Al-Dubban
Fatima from Dayr Al-Dubban
Fatima is a refugee living in Aqabat Jaber Refugee Camp, Jericho. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was only six yea...
Fatima is a refugee living in Aqabat Jaber Refugee Camp, Jericho. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was only six years old when she was carried on her father’s shoulders as they fled their village with their animals. She was the youngest of five brothers. She remembers that they fled to the nearby fields eating only dates and then to Ajjur where they lived in a tent for four years. The villagers were expelled on 23 October 1948 during a military operation. Deir Al-Dubban was located on a sloping hill at the end of the western foothills of the Hebron mountains. The population was 730. It was situated in an area rich with archeological sites dating back to the Canaanite period. They lived by rain fed agriculture and raising animals. The settlement of “Luzit”, composed of Moroccan Jews, was established northeast of the village site in 1955. The village site is now overgrown with thorny plants and remnants of stone buildings. Fatima’s dress is typical of the Hebron area with its colorful patches and rich embroidery and elaborate head wear. Price: $35
Heigar from Al-Dawayima
Heigar from Al-Dawayima
Heigar is a refugee living in the Jalazone Refugee Camp, Ramallah. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was six years o...
Heigar is a refugee living in the Jalazone Refugee Camp, Ramallah. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was six years old when she left the village with her mother, brother, and sister. She carried her sister on her shoulders because she was too young to walk. Her father died before she was born due to illness; therefore, her mother farmed the over 500 acres of land they owned by herself. They grew figs, olives, grapes, corn and wheat. She remembers her mother owned an olive press and made their own oil. She remembers that the old people were killed on a Friday while praying in the mosque and that the older boys were shot protecting the younger boys. Over 90 villagers were killed on 29 October 1948. In 1945, the population was 3,710. The village was located along the top of a wide rocky ridge on the western side of the Hebron mountains and was known for its weekly Friday market. In the Bible, the village’s name was “Bascca”. The settlement of “Amatzia” was built in 1955 on the ruins of the village. The southern side of the village still contains terraces and remnants of people’s homes where displaced villagers still return to picnic. Heigar’s dress is typical of the southern part of the Hebron region with its red thread and wheat designs. Price: $35
Mariam from Beit Nabala
Mariam from Beit Nabala
Mariam is a refugee living in the Jalazone Refugee Camp, Ramallah. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was 16 years o...
Mariam is a refugee living in the Jalazone Refugee Camp, Ramallah. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was 16 years old and newly married when she was forced to flee her village in July 1948. During the British mandate, soldiers set up a military camp just outside the village. Mariam said “the British and the Haganah were raining down bullets on our head. I saw a woman breastfeeding a baby shot before my eyes. I couldn’t stop to pick up the baby. What happened to that baby?”. Beit Nabala was a small village on a rocky hill, which overlooked Al-Lydd and was connected by a railway to Haifa and to villages to the east and southeast .In 1945, there were 2,310 Palestinians living in the village. The villagers cultivated wheat, fruits, olives, and grapes. There were also citrus groves and banana trees irrigated by wells. The settlement of “Kfar Truman” (named after US President Truman) was established in 1949 west of the village site. “Beit Nehemia” was founded on the south side in 1950. The village today is overgrown with grass and thorny bushes. On the fringes of the village, you can find the remains of quarries and crumbled houses. Mariam’s dress is typical of the Jaffa region where the district of Al-Ramla is situated. Her dress is embroidered with citrus fruits and cypress trees on white linen. Price: $35
Zahiyah from Al-Masmiyya Al Kabira
Zahiyah from Al-Masmiyya Al Kabira
Zahiyah is a refugee living in Aqabat Jaber Refugee Camp, Jericho. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was 17 years ol...
Zahiyah is a refugee living in Aqabat Jaber Refugee Camp, Jericho. She is shown here in a fancy dress often worn for celebrations. She was 17 years old when she was forced from her village with her family. She remembers that the Muslims and Jews lived together in the village and that their Jewish neighbors and British soldiers from the nearby camp told them to leave and return in a week or two! The villagers were expelled on 8 July 1948. Al-Masmiyya Al Kabira was a village in the District of Gaza situated on the southern coastal plane. The village was at the junction of highways going north and south. The population in 1945 was 2,520. It had two mosques and two schools—one for boys and another for girls. The dominant crops were grains and citrus fruits. The village was captured during operations to eliminate the Arab civilian population. Four settlements were established on village lands along with two state farms built in the 1950s. Today the girls’ school is deserted while the boys’ school has been turned into an Israeli army installation. Some of the houses are inhabited by Jew immigrants, but others turned into warehouses. Zahiyah’s dress is typical of the Gaza region with dark blue cloth and grain and citrus motifs. Price: $35
Zana from Auja Al-Hafir near Beersheba
Zana from Auja Al-Hafir near Beersheba
Zana is a refugee living in Nuseirat Refugee Camp, Gaza. She was 12 years old when she and her mother and brothers were forced under gunfire by an Isr...
Zana is a refugee living in Nuseirat Refugee Camp, Gaza. She was 12 years old when she and her mother and brothers were forced under gunfire by an Israeli militia to flee from their village, which was located near the ancient road junction and water wells in the Naqab desert south of Beer Assabe’ called Beersheba today. She remembers fleeing her village with her mother and brothers and heading towards the sea without her father because he had to go back and find her sister. The militia stole their sheep and killed eight men. They walked two days to get to Khan Yunis. Auja Al-Hafir has always been used for military purposes. During the British Mandate, it was a prison camp for Palestinian prisoners. In 1948, the Egyptians used it as a military base. Israel occupies the land today and uses it as military base as well. The pattern of Zana’s dress reflects the Bedouin use of bright colored squares and dark blue embroidery on black. Price: $35
Zuhdiyah from Deir Yassin
Zuhdiyah from Deir Yassin
Zuhdiyah lives in the Old City of Jerusalem. She is shown here in a fancy dress typical of the Jerusalem area. She was 16 years old when she had to fl...
Zuhdiyah lives in the Old City of Jerusalem. She is shown here in a fancy dress typical of the Jerusalem area. She was 16 years old when she had to flee her village on April 10th at 2:00 AM with her family. Her family lived on the west side of town when they heard about the soldiers coming from the east side and killing everyone including the women and children. Deir Yassin is noted for the massacre that took place and killed over 90 people. It has become a byword for atrocities committed during 1948 and the exodus of Palestinians. The area was rich in limestone quarries making it a center for stone crushing and trucking. In 1945, the population was 610 people. In the summer of 1949, several hundred Jewish immigrants settled near Deir Yassin in the settlement of “Giv’at Sha’ul”. Today many of the village houses have been incorporated into an Israeli hospital for the mentally ill. The other houses have been turned into warehouses. Zuhdiyah’s dress is typical of the Jerusalem area with its bright orange couch stitching on gold threaded Syrian silk. Price: $35
Purchase a Gift to Support Refugee Women!
Purchase a Gift to Support Refugee Women!
Check out these olive wood dolls that shed light on Palestinian women’s forced displacement....
Check out these olive wood dolls that shed light on Palestinian women’s forced displacement.
Doll-Matching Bracelets
Doll-Matching Bracelets
You love embroidered bracelets? These matching bracelets are the perfect fit for you! (Please indicate the desired piece using the numbers in the pho...
You love embroidered bracelets? These matching bracelets are the perfect fit for you! (Please indicate the desired piece using the numbers in the photo) Price per piece: $7 Price per set: $30
Christmas Tree Ornaments
Christmas Tree Ornaments
We offer you matching ornaments that you can use to add a Palestinian touch to your Christmas tree! (Please indicate the desired piece using the numb...
We offer you matching ornaments that you can use to add a Palestinian touch to your Christmas tree! (Please indicate the desired piece using the numbers in the photo) Price per piece: $10 Price per set: $ 35
Breaking Down the Wall
Breaking Down the Wall
A 10 inch five piece olive wood replica of the Israeli Annexation Wall, which comes with a booklet including facts about the Wall and its impact on Pa...
A 10 inch five piece olive wood replica of the Israeli Annexation Wall, which comes with a booklet including facts about the Wall and its impact on Palestinians, especially women and farmers. It also comes with small stickers of graffiti drawings found on the Bethlehem part of the Wall. The replica can be used in a multiple of ways including but not limited to its use throughout the Advent season, as it comes with prayers and stories for each Sunday in Advent and Christmas Eve. The idea is to simply knock down a piece of the Wall until Jesus is born without barriers on Christmas Eve. Price for the whole set: $20
The Wise Women Also Came
The Wise Women Also Came
Highlights the inclusion of the wise women who must have also come to witness the light, the birth of the Prince of Peace, and celebrate new life. The...
Highlights the inclusion of the wise women who must have also come to witness the light, the birth of the Prince of Peace, and celebrate new life. These are three olive wood dolls that come with a small booklet describing their use during Epiphany and includes the wonderful poem by Jan L. Richardson who has kindly given us her support and blessing for this project. We believe it is time to make visible the presence and contributions of these women. Towards re-imagining women’s participation and inclusion, we invite you to use these dolls and the accompanying poems to reflect on women’s participation and leadership in our sacred story and in our present lives. Price for the whole set: $65
Flight into Egypt
Flight into Egypt
A biblical event described in the Gospel of Matthew in which Joseph fled with his wife Mary and their son, Jesus, because they learned that King Herod...
A biblical event described in the Gospel of Matthew in which Joseph fled with his wife Mary and their son, Jesus, because they learned that King Herod intended to kill all infants in the area of Bethlehem. The émigré Holy Family of Nazareth fleeing into Egypt is the archetype of every Palestinian refugee family. We invite you to use this statue to lift up all who are refugees today including the over 11.6 million Palestinians dispersed throughout the world. Use it to remember your sacred roots to this Holy Family and how they connect us to all families and all refugees. We also call on you to promote and work for refugee rights, specifically the right of return. Price: $15